Conference Video

Dancer Bageshree Vaze

Dr. Anthony Schrag
Bageshree is an Indo-Canadian dance artist and musician. Raised in St. John’s, NL, she initially trained in Bharatha Natyam and studied Hindustani vocal music with her father, Damodar Vaze. She later trained in Kathak with Jai Kishan Maharaj in New Delhi and studied with the renowned vocalist Veena Sahasrabuddhe in Mumbai.

You can learn more about Bageshree on our Speakers Page.

Performance Video

Transcript:

>> Hello, everyone. We are live with ourlast performance of the day. Another accomplished Humber graduate BageshreeVaze.

She'll take it away for personal introductions.

>> Hi. Namaste, everyone. I'm Bageshreeand we're really happy to be here today as part of the Culture's Compass andinteracting with all of you virtually. I know we're all too used to this nowafter a few months of being indoors, but art has to continue, our interactionswith people and with audiences are continuing as they always have since humanactivity. It's always been the desire of humans to dance and perform and playinstruments and regardless of whatever's happening politically and what's goingaround. Somehow, that activity always continues. So we're happy to be here inthis virtual setting with you.

Vinith were both brought up here in Canada. Weare bringing art forms that we have studied in India with Indian classicalmusic and distance. Vinith is a disciple of the late legendary [not audible].He'll tell you more and you'll be able to hear more of these drums here, andI'm performing a dance which is a dance style unique and the drums provides --they provide the rhythmic vocabulary that we set to movement and footwork.

And we'll explain a little bit more as we goalong how we tell stories with rhythmic patterns and with choreography andbringing them to life visually.

Vinith will show you how we E Pleau a storythrough the rhythm with a 16-beat cycle. He'll explain the demarcation of thedifferent rhythms and how he brings it alive.

>> Good afternoon, everybody.

Vinith. These are the drums from the northernpart of India.

To give you a bit of a -- not an education butsort of like a glimpse of in terms of what happens, all what I play, I wouldfirst learned the language. The language doesn't mean anything for say, buteach of the syllables I can recite by voice. If I was to say ta, epe.

Har. So this is what the drums, we have thislanguage, and then we compose, and then basically it's there to provide arhythmic time cycle n this time cycle accident we're going to show 16 beats.I'll open with a small opening, and then nowadays, since we're allelectronically oriented, definitely this time has the last three months, fourmonths, so much has changed about us, first with the onset of COVID and thenit's made you think about your art and think about our lives in different ways.

And I think we're very lucky that we do havethese art forms in our lives. But there's also a lot of change that things havepushed forward especially with Black Lives Matter, and I think it's veryimportant for us to all recognize that change is not just inevitable, but it'snecessary. So to discuss a bit with my iPhone here, I'm going to turn it on. Ithas an electronic Leda. It will be giving a melodic time cycle, and it's in 16beats.

>> I would just like to say that Vinithand I obviously being at home, we have a lot of time to think about art, and it'smade me reflect that the classical arts in India, especially, did not originatein theatres and on stages that we are so used to now. They originated in smallspaces, in front of very informal audiences who were connoisseurs and it was aform of just sharing artists' work with these type settings. So we're reallyhappy we can do the same thing here now.

>> So the time cycle is 16 beats no one asita. I'll show you the beats are. The starting beat is 1234, five, six, seven,eight, nine, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16. Clap, and den den da da. Ta.

[ Drums ]

>> Cymbals and. Ta ta ta ta.

Ta ta ta ta.

>> Next is exploration where we try tofind our way through the runway of this cycle. Figuring out different ways ofhaving to first week and different patterns to different stories.

And right now, we're putting together movement.

[ Drums ]

>> I study the style, so it's believed tocome from the city of Lakor in India. Some believe that competitions are veryvery old, and they were handed down from one generation to another.

But as artists, as individuals, we try to comeup with our own very yeaings of these. This is a personal -- there's nothingabout them.

>> Taking on this, the Gadita.

He grew up in Nova Scotia and I grew up in St.John's Newfoundland, we often try to take inspiration from what we see in theworld around us.

That's how dance has been created, takingdifferent themes. The sound gA deeta gA deet is like the sound of the seagulls.As we see them on the ocean, we imagine different rhythms in the water.

[ Making sounds ]

>> Taking that all together.

[ Making sounds ]

[ Drum ]

>> So now we move on to the double and ashe explained, the 16-beat cycle, we make it shorter and then make faster indifferent types of comp sigs.

>> Taking some of the beats and throwingthe rhythm on top.

[ Making sounds ]

>> So with the dance, and the drums, it'sa conversation.

Just as we're having lots of conversations now,but sometimes we try to put the conversation.

Some people may call it an argument. And aninteraction between dance and the drum.

[ Drum ]

>> So some of the -- as it's developed,there have been different types of stories we tell with rhythm. One of theideas is [not audible] and it takes syllables that sound like the sounds ofnature and try to put them into a pattern. So when you hear HooNa lunga,imagine the sound of a horse jumping in the forest. We take some of thesesyllables and butt them to dense.

[ Making sounds ]

[ Drum ]

>> Now we don't have a lot of travelhappening in the age of COVID, especially international travel. In Toronto,we've had great opportunities for visiting artists from other countries such asIndia but also England, many Indian artists who come to perform, teach. Lastyear, we had a great privilege and opportunity of interacting with Shree anexponent and lived in England and many people know his famous disciple Karr inthe dance world. He came here last year and Vinith the opportunity to performwith him last October. We held some master classes and this is what he taught us.

[ Making sounds ]

[ Drum ]

>> And just to finish off, right now inIndia, we're in the middle of the rainy season known as the monsoon. And whilepeople are with the season after a very long hot dry season to replenish theircrops, it's not just something of necessity, but you see these wonderful darkpurple rain clouds. As they build, and then there are different rhythms of therain, pitter-patter, and sometimes much more heavier, and lightning strikes. Sotry to bring that through to life.

[ Making sounds ]

[ Drum ]

>> Thank you. Namaste. And thank you forhaving us here this afternoon. All the best for the rest of the conference, forthe rest of the year as we all get together here virtually, probably for thenext little while. And share each other's stories and art.

>> Thank you.

>> Thank you, and I'd like to reintroduceMikita and Jennifer Gordon to speak to us to our closing performance.

>> Namaste. Thank you so much.

I feel that my legs are still moving as the restof high body.

It was really great. So that was it for today.And thank you, everyone, who joined us today. It was very busy day.

But we have one more to come.

So tomorrow, we're going to discuss engaging audiencesin digital spaces, financial sustainability and fund raising and activities inthe arts, and we'll meet new speakers and enjoy two more artists' performances,including our mystery artist who is going to close the conference tomorrow.

I also want to remind you that we have MichelleBucles who was creating a visual recording of all the sessions today. Some ofthem are already available today. You can check out the social media and we'llshare her artwork later with you. So Jennifer, do we have Jennifer here? Maybeyou will share your thoughts about the conference today. Jennifer. Do I haveJennifer? Tech team.

>> Yes, just one moment.

>> OK. Great. Hey, Jennifer.

How did you find today's conference?

>> I mean, I think today was incredible,and I -- in addition to thanking the performers, I really have to hand it onall of you students who put this together and produced this.

Round of applause!

Thank you so much. Yes!

It's been phenomenal. It's gone from, you know,a little tech blip in the beginning and here we are, and I think it's rolledreally well. It's interesting to see the patterns that are coming through. I'mseeing the braid motion here and thinking about the different links between allthe speakers and the energy of the comedienne even though she couldn't see us,and she brought everyone's energy so up and then with this beautiful closingdance performance, that was echoing and rain and exterior space and forests, tosee this really ancient art form presented in the ding -- digital space, I feelrelaxed and soothed and I really excited for tomorrow. Thank you all involved,the speakers the panelist and of course to you our audience. Thank you so muchand we're look forward to see youing again tomorrow morning.

Join us then.

>> Thank you so much. See you tomorrow.

Welcome and Keynote Address Chat Log

Below is a log of the live chat that occurred during this talk. The format is:

Timestamp

Username

Comment

Emojis that were used in the chat will appear between colons, e.g., :smile:

Chat Log:

00:10:09

Culture's Compass

Hello everyone! Welcome to the  Musical Performance featuring Bageshree Vaze.
 
 This is a reminder to please keep all questions and comments appropriate to  the performance, and to refrain from using inappropriate language.

00:10:01

Culture's Compass

Also, the official conference hashtag  is #CulturesCompass2020 use it on Instagram, Facebook, Twitter,  and LinkedIn.
 
 We want to hear your thoughts and feedback. Let's keep the conversation  going.
 
 We hope you're all enjoying the conference so far!

00:02:32

Chris Coxson

Bageshree Vaze is a wonderful  performer. I've seen her at many shows when I was working at Harbourfront  Centre in Toronto

00:01:43

Chris Coxson

Looking forward to this!

00:00:19

Alannah

so excited!!

00:01:49

Kristen Turner

Ahhh so exciting!!

00:02:31

Marcia

:smiley:

00:07:07

Natalka Duncan

So cool!!!!

00:07:11

Kristen Turner

:clap: :clap:

00:07:25

Maria Morgunova

:thumbs up:

00:08:07

Chris Coxson

The drum sounds are almost as good as  live! They resonate quite well digitally!

00:08:20

Kristen Turner

Agreed, it's lovely!

00:08:35

Robin Clipsham

Wonderful!

00:08:50

Kyla Ross

and the bells on Bageshree's ankles.  its a lovely sound

00:09:19

Kyla Ross

I'm tapping my feet along with her

00:10:34

Chris Coxson

Watch her facial expressions too. It  helps follow the mood and story. I once had an audience member interpret  Sanskrit words/meaning for me!

00:11:00

Jennifer Gordon

I feel so light right now; such  beauty

00:11:03

amanda

This reminds me of my childhood!

00:11:10

Kristen Turner

:clap: :clap:

00:11:34

Charity Chan

:dancer:

00:11:58

Jennifer Gordon

Such a stunning dreamscape

00:12:06

Marcia

Wow!

00:12:17

Celyne Gaspe

So much talent!

00:13:10

Kristen Turner

I really love the use of varying  volume on the drums too - what an incredible way of storytelling

00:13:37

Diane Davy

The drums are like bells ringing.  Beautiful.

00:13:42

Jocelyn Johnston

:clap:

00:14:06

Celyne Gaspe

Thank you!

00:14:11

Abir

Amazing performance :heart:

00:14:44

Natalka Duncan

:clap: :clap: :clap:

00:14:44

Jennifer Gordon

This is so wonderful to see an old  art form in a digital space. It's presenting beutifully

00:15:03

Kyla Ross

Totally agree Jenn, was just thinking  the same

00:15:14

Kyla Ross

yet it feels quite intimate and  educational

00:15:26

Chris Coxson

Look her up under her name. You can  see other magnificent performances she has created

00:15:49

Kyla Ross

https://www.bageshree.com/bio

00:16:08

Kristen Turner

Thanks Chris and Kyla - I know how  I'll be spending my evening!

00:16:57

Juliana

Amazing!  :clap::skin-tone-3::clap::skin-tone-3:

00:16:58

Jennifer Gordon

The precision....

00:18:00

Chris Coxson

Yes, and the beautiful integration of  body language, sound, rhythm, storytelling is mesmerizing.

00:18:21

Culture's Compass

If you are loving what you're seeing  and hearing, please show your support through paypal and send  pratibhaarts@yahoo.com some love!

00:20:06

Maria Morgunova

Sounds like music therapy and art at  the same time.

00:21:44

Chris Coxson

I feel so fortunate to have seen her  live performances!

00:22:36

Jennifer Gordon

The blue and gold is calling up sea  and sky

00:26:03

amanda

just gorgeous!!!

00:26:16

Kyla Ross

:clap:

00:26:27

Kyla Ross

:clap: :clap: :clap: :clap:

00:27:02

Chris Coxson

If you like her performances, also  check out Menaka Thakkar Dance Company.

00:27:17

Maria Morgunova

beautiful dress :rose:

00:29:43

Cole Swanson

Super beautiful. The incorporation of  dance, rhythm and the speaking of beats reads as this multi-layered, embodied  practice. Would be a wonderful way to engage cognitive and corporeal methods  of learning!

00:30:24

amanda

that spin amirite?

00:30:32

Pam Briz

:clap: :clap:

00:30:47

Kristen Turner

:clap: :clap:

00:30:47

Natalka Duncan

:clap: :clap: :clap: :clap:

00:30:47

Layan A.

:clap: :clap: :clap:

00:30:53

Celyne Gaspe

Namaste

00:30:57

Jenneen Beattie

:raised_hands:

00:30:59

Natalka Duncan

Wooo !!! Thank you guys so much!!

00:31:00

Kristen Turner

Thank you for that beautiful  performance

00:31:01

Hayden

Wonderful. Thank you!

00:31:01

Jennifer Dick

Enjoying the dance performance with  the  breaking of our digital fourth  wall.

00:31:02

Elka

Namaste!

00:31:02

Jocelyn Johnston

:clap: :clap:

00:31:03

Hana Glaser

:clap: :clap:

00:31:05

Maria Morgunova

Thank you

00:31:05

Kyla Ross

:clap: :clap: :clap:

00:31:07

Jennifer Dick

Thank you

00:31:09

Tuhin

:clap: :clap:

00:31:09

Kyla Ross

Thank you!!

00:31:10

Cole Swanson

Thank you!

00:31:23

Alyssa Pataracchia

:clap:

00:31:35

Phil Anderson

Thanks  soo much !

00:31:41

Marcia

:smile:

00:32:02

Claudia Molina

:clap:

00:34:08

Diane Davy

Thank you Humber - terrific job with  tight timelines. Love partnering with you guys!

00:34:18

Chris Coxson

All in all, very encouraging,  exciting, and gives us hope!

00:34:24

Catriona

Thank you, see you tomorrow!

00:34:27

Maria Morgunova

See you tomorroe thanks

00:34:29

Kyla Ross

Thanks everyone!

00:34:29

Kristen Turner

Bye everyone!

00:34:31

Kyla Ross

great job!

00:34:42

Natalka Duncan

See everyone tomorrow!!

00:35:27

Culture's Compass

To learn more about our team at check  out the Culture's Compass website!  https://www.culturescompass.com/conference-team